BSA Standard Variant 2L

A place to discuss and share pictures, reviews, of your rifles.

Moderators: SysAdmin, zunmik, pmh

BSA Standard Variant 2L

Postby gab » Tue Jun 10, 2014 3:20 am

At a Vancouver Island gun show the weekend before last, I was offered a BSA Standard Variant 2 L (.177). It was the first I had ever seen in the flesh so naturally it had to come home with me to keep my full size BSA Standard company. Here is a photo showing the difference in size, as well as photos of the L variant.

Image
Image[/URL[URL=http://s298.photobucket.com/user/bessy_the_cat/media/IMG_0803.jpg.html]Image

The barrel is 17", LOP is 14.25" and OAL 39 7/8". If there was any etching on the barrel, it is long gone. Aside from the serial number (L38740), the only other marking on the barrel is a 1 between the rear sight and pellet loading port. On the stock is what appears to be a crown (could be the pylarms logo - is indistinct) behind the trigger guard and 14 1/4 has been marked into the stock behind the pistol grip.

Does anyone have an idea of the year of manufacture? I shall also post this on Garvin's site in hopes of obtaining an answer.
gab
 
Posts: 47
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 4:51 am
Location: Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada

Re: BSA Standard Variant 2L

Postby Certus » Tue Jun 10, 2014 11:02 am

Hi gab,

As I'm sure you are already aware, the L designated Light Pattern Standard Air Rifle was produced between 1919-1936. Unfortunately, unlike pre-WW1 BSA rifles it's not so easy to accurately date them using the Ser No alone. If I was making a guess, I would estimate your rifle to have been made around 1933-1934.

The picture below is of an interesting BSA Improved Mod / L Pattern “Transitional” air rifle I picked up some time ago. The rifle is mostly late Improved Mod D and is marked as such, but has the lock work from the post WW1 L Pattern. The L Pattern which appeared in 1919 included the introduction of the front push-button cocking lever release and dispensed with the trigger adjustment screw which would normally go through the front of trigger guard. BSA would have been keen to use up any components left over from the earlier model resulting in a number of hybrid transitional rifles which can sometimes confuse collectors. This example has Ser No 296 so would have been made during the first few months of BSA recommencing production in 1919.

Image
Regards


Brian
Certus
Sharpshooter
Sharpshooter
 
Posts: 428
Joined: Sun May 12, 2013 8:34 am
Location: Worthing West Sussex

Re: BSA Standard Variant 2L

Postby pmh » Tue Jun 10, 2014 7:51 pm

What a nice find.

Always good to go to fairs and come away with something special.

Kind regards,



Phil
M0KPH
I now have so many airguns I've had to make a list, which is >>HERE<<
>>North Manchester Target Club<<
User avatar
pmh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1807
Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2012 5:07 pm
Location: Bury, Lancashire


Return to Air Rifles

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests

cron