Refinishing a Stock - 2 - Applying the Oil

A place to share your projects, technical advice. and tutorials

Moderators: SysAdmin, zunmik, pmh

Refinishing a Stock - 2 - Applying the Oil

Postby Tank » Fri Mar 29, 2013 7:54 pm

So, now that we have all the old varnish off, you will be left with something like this:

Image

Image

Now, there is no easy way to say this - the next bit is hard work. If you skimp here it will just come back to bite you in the ass later.
You need to start with something along the lines of 180 grit silicon carbide paper, here is an example:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Silicon-Carbide ... 848&sr=8-1

You will need to buy a couple of sheets of 180 Grit 240 grit 360 grit 600 and 800 grit and you need a sanding block - a simple cork block is the best and a sheet will cut up into four. Don't fall into the trap of using worn out sandpaper in place of a finer grit. Worn out sandpaper - okay, Silicone Carbide paper - is just that, worn out. Replenish the paper as soon as it is clogged. I cannot give you any magical tips here, it takes a bit of common sense. I find wrapping the abrasive paper around bits of dowel and other tools helps a lot. Also a selection of files helps here. You can for instance grind the tang of a file to a point using a dremel or even the back step! This can then be used to clean out the chequering as an example, you can even use it as a file!
The only thing I can say as a golden tip is this - ALWAYS sand WITH the grain. We always say that for one stroke of the sandpaper accross the grain it takes ten strokes with the grain to put it right.
Personally I have not found this to be true, it is more like a hundred and ten! Always use the sanding block wherever possible, long easy strokes and always with an even easy pressure. I always work up to 600 or even 800 grit over a couple of evenings.

It is always decision time here regarding any severe dings the stock may have sustained. You have three choices, you can literally "sand them out" taking the wood down to a level below the mark and removing it this way, you can choose to sand the bottom of the wound but leave the actual mark in the wood, I do this on occassion or you can steam the dent out.

This letter technique is very simple - all you do is go get yourself the iron from where the better half keeps it (always best to undertake this when she is out!) and turn it up to the "High" or "Cotton" setting. Then dampen the wound, wet the bottom of the dent in the wood. You then apply heat. I use the tip of the iron and try to keep the heat as local as possible. Sometimes a damp cloth helps. You will be amazed at just how effective this technique is. You must remember though, you are wetting the timber and then applying a LOT of heat so it is always best to leave the stock at least overnight to let things settle down before assessing things.

Now, the Oil part.
I have read some very interesting posts on some of the forums and some of the authors really have put some time and effort into finding a good oil. From my reading I have determined that "Welsh Willy" provides a decent stock refinishing kit. He has worked out that one of the finest oils you can use is Tung oil. Yes, made using real Tungs! : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tung_oil
I have also read a load of old cobblers - using frying oil from the Supermarket - REALLY! Why, you going to deep fry it. What a load of of Tosh! Cooking oil is NOT for refinishing wood
One of the best attributes of Tung oil is that it is totally waterproof so you can use this technique on stocks for ten metre match rifles or Hunting Carbines and everything in between. My brand of choice is Liberon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B000 ... sc=1&s=diy only because I have been using it for years now and I know it's characteristics. This particular oil is a blend of Tung oil, driers and approximately 10% Polyeurathane - yes, that's right, it has polyeurathane in it. This guarantees it will dry to a hard durable finish.
ONLY start the next part if you are 100% certain that you are happy with the finish you have produced. I am deliberately missing out the staining part here and concentrating on getting the oil finish on the stock. I will leave the staining part to a seperate paragraph of its own at the end of this piece. Suffice to say: If you want a totally, purely natural finish - apply the oil now. If you are going to stain the stock, go to the end - read that bit and then come back here.

Applying the oil:-
I have always applied the oil warm, not hot and don't be daft enough to stick it in the Microwave to warm it up (it has happened!) just put the tim on the radiator for half an hour or so before you start. Find a small plastic bowl - I use the bottom of a plastic milk container because it can be thrown away after use. Apply the oil with OOOO steel wool - this is ultrafine steel wool: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Liberon-Steel-W ... 904&sr=1-1
I always wear disposable gloves for this job otherwise you are going to need some white spirit to clean up with. Soak the stock, don't be shy, get plenty on, wipe the stuff on vigourously with the steel wool. I then hang it somewhere warm to dry overnight, make sure there is something under it otherwise you may find yourself buying a new carpet!

Three coats is the absolute minimum. After applying the first coat and leaving it to dry for twenty four hours or so go back and find the packet of wire wool you bought earlier on in this project. This next step is simple, sand the whole stock down again using the medium wire wool until it looks like you have completely removed the oil finish. Then apply another coat, lightly and gently using the OOOO Steel Wool again. Then leave it overnight to dry and then start the whole process again. After the third or fourth application you should have something as smooth as glass. Remember, because of the type of finish this is, if you rub through the finish you just apply some more.

The last step - and this is the "big secret" to an oiled finish. Wax the stock, I use Briwax because I like it for this particular application and again I use the OOOO Wire wool as the applicator and a big piece of soft cotton to buff it in the final step. This gives a lovely sheen to the wood but also you will be able to grip the stock firmly and securely, any marks on the stock can also be easily buffed out after you have used it on the range.

This is the result you are looking for:

Image

This is what it looked like before I started:

Image
graham.
I’m going off to go find myself. If I’m not back by the time I return, keep me here.
User avatar
Tank
Sharpshooter
Sharpshooter
 
Posts: 467
Joined: Sat Jan 05, 2013 7:08 pm
Location: Manchester

Postby zooma » Fri Apr 12, 2013 6:45 am

Hi Tank - have you ever tried beeswax for the final waxing of an oiled stock?

I only ask this as I happen to have a new tin of this - and a freshly oiled stock (one that looks remarkably like the one you have just stripped in part one of your re-finishing guide).

If the Briwax has significant advantages I will start hunting around for a tin of that instead - but the days of the good old fashioned hardware shop in every small town or village has sadly gone - but I will try Asda and Tesco - you never know!
Last edited by zooma on Sat Apr 27, 2013 9:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Feinwerkbau P40 Tricolour wanted.........still !
http://www.bobsairguns .com - proud to host the RMTC site since April 2011.
zooma
Lifetime Contributor to Shooting
Lifetime Contributor to Shooting
 
Posts: 648
Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2012 9:12 pm
Location: Rossendale

Postby Tank » Fri Apr 12, 2013 5:43 pm

zooma:2535 wrote:have you ever tried beeswax for the final waxing of an oiled stock?


Beeswax is certainly a great finish and maintenance tool but unfortunately the melting point, the low melting point of Beeswax, brings with it the unfortunate side effect of "sticky fingers" on a warm day :shock:

No, Briwax is your best bet. For lots of reasons too :- you can polish the furniture with it if you wish :D  I gained a few points with the missus!

If you have a good layer of wax , quality wax, on any wood surface it will offer a protection against day to day wear and tear AND it is easy to repair quite severe dings in the fabric of the stock without having to try to refinish large areas as it is a simple, though energetic, task to blend the damaged area back in to the rest of the stock. You are not "feeding" the wood by waxing - the wood is long dead - you won't bring it back (if you do, let me know, I have a plan!) - but what you are doing, over time, is building up several microscopic laters of protection that are easily manipulated using simple White Spirit which is readily available (and cheap).

I am NOT exclusively endorsing "Briwax" either, it is the one readily available though and there are plenty of alternatives. A tub will last you years too.
graham.
I’m going off to go find myself. If I’m not back by the time I return, keep me here.
User avatar
Tank
Sharpshooter
Sharpshooter
 
Posts: 467
Joined: Sat Jan 05, 2013 7:08 pm
Location: Manchester

Postby pmh » Fri Apr 12, 2013 9:27 pm

Just had a quick check on ebay, and it is freely available on there in various shades and tin sizes.

Kind regards,



Phil
M0KPH
I now have so many airguns I've had to make a list, which is >>HERE<<
>>North Manchester Target Club<<
User avatar
pmh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1807
Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2012 5:07 pm
Location: Bury, Lancashire

Postby Tank » Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:01 pm

And here are the pics of Bob's FWB150 stock, the one used for the original photographs demonstrating stripping the varnish.
I took it off him because he didn't have any Briwax? So I have slowly finished it for him. This is a process that cannot be rushed and if you are impatient - forget it and don't even start. The best thing to do is work on it a little and then leave it for a while so the solvents disperse, then do a little more. It is absolutely silky smooth:

Image

Image

Image
graham.
I’m going off to go find myself. If I’m not back by the time I return, keep me here.
User avatar
Tank
Sharpshooter
Sharpshooter
 
Posts: 467
Joined: Sat Jan 05, 2013 7:08 pm
Location: Manchester

Postby zooma » Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:15 pm

pmh:2540 wrote:Just had a quick check on ebay, and it is freely available on there in various shades and tin sizes.

Kind regards,



Phil
 Hi Phil,

I gave up trying to find a supply of Briwax locally and bought a tin of it from Amazon at a good price and with free delivery - so I am all kitted-up for the  future.

Once on Amazon I noticed that they had several options of Briwax, but I chose the "Original Clear" option as being the most useful type for me, but the coloured ones could be helpful for anyone with a darker finished stock perhaps?

Meanwhile Tank has waxed my 150 stock for me using his method  described above, so we all have a target to refer to when we try to make a similar finish ourselves.
Last edited by zooma on Sat Apr 27, 2013 9:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Feinwerkbau P40 Tricolour wanted.........still !
http://www.bobsairguns .com - proud to host the RMTC site since April 2011.
zooma
Lifetime Contributor to Shooting
Lifetime Contributor to Shooting
 
Posts: 648
Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2012 9:12 pm
Location: Rossendale

Postby zooma » Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:22 pm

Tank:2630 wrote:And here are the pics of Bob's FWB150 stock, the one used for the original photographs demonstrating stripping the varnish.
I took it off him because he didn't have any Briwax? So I have slowly finished it for him. This is a process that cannot be rushed and if you are impatient - forget it and don't even start. The best thing to do is work on it a little and then leave it for a while so the solvents disperse, then do a little more. It is absolutely silky smooth:

Image

Image

Image


That looks fabulous Mr Tank, I look forward to seeing it in the flesh tonight at RMTC, and having a go at getting a finish as good as that on my new project - a 300SU stock!

Now I have the information from you and the "tools", I just need to work at it to see if this new project ends-up looking as good as the 150 you have finished for me!
Feinwerkbau P40 Tricolour wanted.........still !
http://www.bobsairguns .com - proud to host the RMTC site since April 2011.
zooma
Lifetime Contributor to Shooting
Lifetime Contributor to Shooting
 
Posts: 648
Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2012 9:12 pm
Location: Rossendale

Re: Refinishing a Stock - 2 - Applying the Oil

Postby johnbaz » Sun Dec 01, 2013 9:58 pm

A lovely stock and a job well done :clap:


Cheers, John :dance:
johnbaz
Plinker
Plinker
 
Posts: 77
Joined: Sun Dec 01, 2013 5:29 pm

Re: Refinishing a Stock - 2 - Applying the Oil

Postby zooma » Sun Dec 29, 2013 12:50 pm

Following Graham's advice I have now refinished a few more stocks that have all come up well using his techniques and can confirm that the finish achieved is directly equal to the effort put in and that it works very well indeed.
It is also possible to "sympathetically" restore a stock so any interesting "battle scars" or minor "dings" that add character to the rifle can remain visible and often contribute to the overall appearance.
A mint and "as new" effect of course can be achieved and sometimes it takes more time to decide what constitutes damage and what constitutes character when deciding what to "make good" and what to preserve.
I have used Danish Oil for the stocks that I have restored as it is easy to find locally and it works very effectively and then I finish it with Briwax - both the oil and the Briwax is applied with fine grade wire wool with the wax being burnished off with a clean cloth to give the final pleasing "sheen" that I like to see on the finished stock.
In short Graham's advice has helped me to find another new interest that together with modifying pistol grips (that I have been doing for several years already) gives me another interest in my main airguns hobby.
Feinwerkbau P40 Tricolour wanted.........still !
http://www.bobsairguns .com - proud to host the RMTC site since April 2011.
zooma
Lifetime Contributor to Shooting
Lifetime Contributor to Shooting
 
Posts: 648
Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2012 9:12 pm
Location: Rossendale

Re: Refinishing a Stock - 2 - Applying the Oil

Postby kj68 » Mon Feb 10, 2014 6:04 pm

Hi these are a lovely looking stock and a great job you have done to it.
atb kj68 :clap:
Happy Shooting
User avatar
kj68
Marksman
Marksman
 
Posts: 172
Joined: Thu Feb 06, 2014 6:29 pm
Location: County Durham


Return to Projects/Technical Advice/Tutorials

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests

cron